By Nancy Jo Adams

The exceptionally keen eyesight of most wildlife, especially wild turkey, makes it important for hunters to be as concealed as possible in the woods. Often, wildlife will see hunters long before a hunter ever had a clue the game animal was even in the vicinity.

As a husband and wife duo, we have hunted a few times in a ground blind where those hunts required more concealment for additional camera equipment we were running or when guiding a youth or inexperienced hunter. There is nothing worse than being in a ground blind that offers little room and a limited view. Worse yet is a blind that is difficult to put up, which brings back a vivid memory of one such occasion that ruined one of our hunts.


We had planned to place a blind at the edge of a green field where we had toms hanging up on several previous morning hunts. After being roosted a good tom the evening prior to our hunt, we backed out with extreme caution at sunset to keep from pressuring the tom, causing the tom to tree hop or worse—leave the location altogether. We returned to the area the next morning with about 15 minutes to erect a blind and all was going as planned, UNTIL the zipper was unzipped on the blind bag. As carefully and as quietly as we could, we commenced erecting the blind, popping out the top of the blind, which was the only thing that went smoothly. What unfolded in the next fifteen minutes was sheer chaos in the pitch black of the morning. As one of us stayed on one side of the blind and the other stepped over to the opposite side to simultaneously pop the walls out, it quickly became apparent that the frame in the blind was not working properly.


After tugging and yanking the blind, trying to swap sides, getting only one side wall to stand out correctly, huffing, puffing and growling at each other under our breath as quietly as we could to keep the roosted birds from hearing us, we used quite a bit of force with the blind only to break one of the fiberglass wall supports. Now we had a blind with three standing sides and a caved in wall and wouldn’t you guess this is the wall with the zippered entry door. We had to lift the blind up to crawl under so we could get settled in for the hunt.

At this point, we were both drenched in sweat from wrestling with this contraption that had a mind of its own on a hot, humid south Alabama morning and the morning was breaking the horizon. To make matters worse, we didn’t have a decent view from the blind—when the shooter had a good view, the camera had a limited view and vice-versa. Not only was this a horrible start to the morning, we didn’t hear a single sound or see a turkey. It was evident that the turkeys heard or saw all of the shenanigans we experienced that morning.


Since that time, we have overlooked blinds like the plaque until we found a large blind a couple of years ago. This blind had the room but lacked in view so it was used as a last resort and even then, we always thought twice before carrying into the woods.

While attending the NWTF Convention and Sports Show in Nashville, TN, we ran across a new release that changed our view on using blinds. Barronett Blinds introduced a new blind for 2016 that couldn’t be missed on the show floor, the Pentagon. Not only was this blind much larger than the typical ground blind; its shape was much different.


The new Pentagon is the first five-sided hub blind on the market. The pentagon shape allows for larger floor space on the interior of the blind and a better configuration of windows. The larger size blind is just as easy to put up as any typical quality hub style blind; unlike the cheaper brand we got one “unsuccessful” hunt out of. The walls and roof are water-resistant and I even found that the stitching on the seams is of good craftsmanship, which doesn’t allow water to seep through at the seams.


The unique five-sided, pentagon shape allows 70% more interior space than the typical four-sided blind. The wall span is 59” per side with a measurement of 96” from hub to corner and a center height of 72” high for a 41.5 square feet total interior area. The configuration of the blind allows for a panoramic view with windows that dip down low for comfortable viewing and shooting height for all hunters, youth, and adult alike. The noise free, zipperless windows allow for quiet use unlike those that incorporate Velcro. The mesh window inserts are made of a quality camo print, shoot-through mesh for broadheads and include three convenient shooting ports. The integrated peep windows on the back of the blind are an ingenious addition.


All those features are reasons enough to want to add this blind to your hunting arsenal, but the most important is the craftsmanship and quality of the frame and hubs. The framework is made with thicker, stiffer fiberglass poles for durability and strong hubs. Barronett Blinds customer service has a complete stock of parts for replacement should a pole break, the need to replace a shoot-through camo mesh window or should another issue arise.

The Pentagon includes a convenient zippered backpack style carrying case that is made of durable black fabric. The high quality, lightweight fabric is available in Bloodtrail™ Backwoods™ and offers a ground skirt. The blind in the carrying case weighs in at twenty pounds making it easy to carry to your hunting site along with your other gear.


If you have ever set up a blind in the pitch dark of predawn or spent any amount of time hunting in a blind with a second hunter or a cameraman and all his gear, you are well aware of the appreciation of a large, roomy blind. The Barronett Blinds Pentagon Blind offer just that and with a grand panoramic view.